11.5 Imperfect Buddha: Hokai Sobol answers listeners questions

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Here it is folks, the latest episode of the Imperfect Buddha Podcast and the last in our series on post-traditional Buddhism. It is also the final part of our series with Hokai Sobol.

In this interview, Hokai tackles listeners question, well, at least some of them. We had over 18 to get through and although Hokai inadvertently covered some of them whilst answering others, we didn’t get through them all. I think listeners will find something of real value in Hokai’s answers and thoughts as we cover a wide terrain. Some of the questions covered include;

1. Has Hokai played around with any word instead of mystic/mystical?
2. What are the axioms that underlie the mystical approach as you define it? Or, what are the assumptions that drive the mystical approach as you’ve defined it?
3. Can someone pursue all three approaches at the same time? What are some of the possible adverse consequences of doing so?
4. Are religious and therapeutic approaches necessary starting points for a mystical path?
5. Do either of you see a role for community on the mystical path?
6. What are Hokai’s views – if any – about the transmission of mystical practice?
7. Can mystical ways of practice ever be divorced from religious systems/symbolism/language? I suspect not, but I’d be interested to hear.
8. Does Hokai have any general advice for mystical practice in the midst of ‘normal’ life?
9. Where does this approach take us? Is there an end? A goal?
10. Can maps be a tool for people to understand their minds?
11. Is the open discussion of progress on the path helpful? Is it hurtful? Should it be discussed publicly, or left between student and teacher? If it’s hurtful, can you please explain why you believe it to be so?

Hokai’s site & article on post-traditional Buddhism: www.hokai.info/2017/06/meanings-post-traditional/

Theme tune for the episode is from The Naturals: www.hopemanagement.co.uk/thenaturals/

O’Connell Coaching: oconnellcoaching.com/

 

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